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Hey look at that, I actually finished a page of Cloudhopper.

It’s been about five months since the last one, sorry about that, I have a series of excellent excuses. In any case, here it is, can’t exactly guarantee that the next one will be along soon but I’m on it. These pages take as long as the take.

I mean, if you’re curious, yes I spent days drawing this barn, no you cannot see most of it because it is dark, and no I do not plan to ever revisit this area. I hope it’s worth it, it certainly was fun.

Mirrored from Radio Free North Hollywood.

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And with that book two of Cloudhopper comes to an end, thank you very much for your attention. If you'd like to read the entire thing at once you can try my web site:

unnecessaryg.com/cloudhopper

or if you'd just like to see book two I posted it here:

http://geoffsebesta.dreamwidth.org/14961.html

Anyway, so thanks for following this thing for the last year and a half. This story was a bit of a growing experience for me, the art certainly took a turn for the better. It's strange to think that I started this story when I lived in San Diego. Looking back on it, I can see the art change when I moved to Austin (the clouds changed to landscapes), when I went back to college (the buildings got very involved, very cartoonish), when I went to Europe (things became very dark and confusing and architecturally accurate), and finally the slapstick sequence unrelated to anything but the colors orange and green. Fun!

One unexpected benefit of this story was that I fell into something of a weekly rhythm; I've been more-or-less posting something story-related every Monday for a while now. Planning to keep that up. For the next few weeks I'll be posting a script that I wrote called "The Echo Chamber," and after that I will serialize a new story that I'm working on with my friend Gewel Kafka, called "Busta/Lovecraft." Then Cloudhopper 3 will resume.
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The entirety of book two of Cloudhopper lies beyond the cut.

Read more... )
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Je me rangé. I got my new apartment, signed the lease and everything, moved in yesterday. Gewel will be here tomorrow. We're going to spend the summer in Austin, swimming and painting and enjoying each other's company. Sounds pretty good to me.
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Today I drew a picture of Spider-Man punching Qadaffi and then I realized how close that is to my actual view of the world. Like many thoughts, it's both worrying and liberating. Yeah, I navigate stories beyond my experience and comprehension using a symbol set that I developed in childhood, so what? So does everybody. Mine are goofy, I know.

I saw Billy Bob Thornton riding a bike on South 5th Street.

It looks like Gewel and I are moving in to a place near Parker and Oltorf. Hopes are high. The place looks cool. It might happen in the next day or few, who knows. Anyway, it feels like I'm finally moving to Austin, instead of Kincheonville or Outer Mongolia or wherever it was I lived all winter. I mean, I liked it, and my roommates were great, but it wasn't Austin. When I saw this place today the first thing I saw were three scraggly hippies standing on the corner of a collect pond, yelling at a dog trying to get it to do amusing tricks. That's Austin.
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Ralph Hemphill died. We called him Koda. I knew him from the Gathering, but he became a very dear friend -- I visited him in Mexico several times, travelled around America. He was in his late seventies and had been having heart trouble for a while; the last time I saw him I had a pretty good idea we were saying goodbye. Still, it's a smaller world without him.

I don't have many pictures of him:



Ralph was a cool old guy. He lived in a trailer south of Ensenada. He was in the Korean war, as a photographer and analyst for stuff from the U2 project. He knew Lenny Bruce. He was a master carpenter and worked all over Los Angeles building skyscrapers. He spent twelve years living on a boat. I dunno. He lived, he died, in between we were really good friends. I'll miss him.
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Staple was this weekend, whereby hangs a tale. To make it brief, there was an epic run of bad luck but we went out and achieved anyway. Fortunately nobody got hurt, it stopped short of quite that bad. It was just absolutely typical of the way that reality conspires against art.



what follows is no longer brief. Here is a partial list of incredible problems that you would not think we would have to deal with

They moved a giant comic convention in Seattle to be the same week as us.
They shut down the interstate completely (under construction on a Saturday morning).
The printer destroyed my mini-comic (he's a really cool guy, though, he just cut them a centimeter too low and it was an important centimeter).
The lighting didn't work properly in our room, for the second year in a row. Wasn't as bad as last year, wasn't good.
There was a huge mix-up with the badges and they wouldn't release badges to sketchgroup members who were there and reserved badges for people who never showed up.
I had so much trouble getting to the show on Saturday morning that I didn't even get there until 1pm.

Stuff like that. Stuff like that all the time. Oh well, that's the way it is, I've never known causality to be any less than hostile to creative endeavours, but I could have used an easy show.

HOWEVER

It was TREMENDOUS fun. One of the more fun shows I've done for a long time. I felt closer to the people I was around and more creatively in tune than anywhere since Stumptown. I especially enjoyed working so closely with Fiction Circus this last two weeks, I am more convinced than ever that they're on the right track and I want to be part of it. Speaking of which Gewel and I will be in NYC on April 18th to do live art for Derangement of the Senses, a Fiction Circus burlesque thing. Sketchgroup was great, though I think we're all tired, we've put so much in over the last few months and it's not like we get paid. Having the release party the week before Staple was a good idea but it didn't work. The Live Art show was a blast, I got to see a LOT of people that I don't see often who I really like (Dylan, John the podcast guy, Alicia, Wayne, Randy, Kristin, the LEOG crew, everybody basically)

We sold a lot of Sequentulärs, though. That book is a very easy sell. It's so easy that it should probably be more expensive, but it's so much fun having something that's fun and easy to sell and that I really believe in. Here's the pitch for Sequentulär;

"It's ten artists, sixteen stories, a hundred and eight pages and five dollars. It is the best comic book value in this place."

That is far from my most inspired pitch (that's I am the President of Ice Cream; "It's Bugs Bunny meets C-SPAN.") but it is absolutely honest. There is no way anyone in that place was offering more awesome pages for less money. Sequentulär is an incredibly good deal.

My finances have evolved over the last few years since I started paying attention. Before I was just acashular, I didn't have any money and I never spent any money and I didn't care. In my thirties I've tried to take money seriously, to the point where I'm afraid it's all I talk about and I'm being a crashing bore. But the situation has improved. Now I'm in larger debts and larger obligations but I have slightly more disposable income because of the constant influx and egress of small amounts of money into my life. I can now afford whatever burrito I want, and can buy art supplies when I need them. That may not seem like much to you, but practically every dollar I have comes from artistic income that I make through personal sales, and let me tell this situation is better than it was in 2004, when I never had more than $30 at a time from January all the way to September.

Coincidentally 2004 was a great year.

But I do enjoy the freedom to eat at Texas Chili Parlor or Long John Silver every once in a while. I like paying rent.

In the last year or so, which has been a really really good year by the way, easily as good as 2004, I've gotten used to this new freedom, and have started to emerge from my shell a bit. I'm willing to go out and have fun. I'm starting to feel like I don't have to struggle every second or watch every nickel. I can drink a beer. I can't afford two, but I can afford one, every once in a while.

I understand money better now. I understand money has little to do with creativity but it is the lifeblood of distribution. Money is the gas that makes wide-scale distribution go. That's because money is a multiplier, distribution is an exponential game.

However, creation follows an arithmetic progression and the internet tends to divide everything into chunks.

Zach thinks the future of the professional artist is on the internet and I think the internet is the opposite of money. We'll see who's right. I'm increasingly looking to the art world for my bread and butter. Literally. That's what I bought at the grocery store today; bread and butter. It was a star-crossed show, and even though I had a great time it did not translate into affording any fancy food this time.
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IN OTHER NEWS

The Sequentulär/Fiction Circus/Le Sexy show on Friday went really, really well. Here are the few pictures that I took:






If you say, wow that looks like a confusing event in which several things are happening at once and I really can't tell who's supposed to be performing and who's in the audience, well, you're right.

Here's a one-minute illustration for Miracle Jones's crowning short story achievement, "How to Get Laid for Zero Dollars and Zero Cents."



http://miraclejones.blogspot.com/2010/10/how-to-get-laid-for-zero-dollars-and.html

Other illustrations were done at the time but I don't have any of them here at this time so that's that.
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Sometime between the Obama election and Anon takedowns in defense of Wikileaks the Internet (which is of course the leading edge of culture, as far as I know) became decidedly non-ironic but in a completely post-post-ironic way. Which means that I can update my old chart:

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Here's a picture of a "sculpture" I did for some art show.



It's called "Obsolescence" and it's made of an old copy of Austin Powers; the Spy Who Shagged Me, some masking tape, and a quarter. I used a quarter instead of a nickel because it's more artistic.

I made it by weaving video tape together and then folding it like origami. Woven video tape is a very interesting material and I think will have many post-holocaust applications. The black magnetic material flakes right off and the plastic tape is quite strong.

In other news, I finished editing Sequentular and sent it to the printer, and I finished Cloudhopper Book 2 too -- the proofs should be here any day now. More on this as soon as I get the paypal stuff straight.
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Sorry I'm late in posting, I got hit by two cars today. I'm fine, the bike is toast. I was walking my bike on the sidewalk and passed in front of the driveway of a hospital and a woman drove out and hit me, knocking the bike out of my hands and crushing it. Then the cops came. Then as we were all leaving I picked up my bike to go and another truck came out of the same driveway and drove over it again. So the bike is...cursed, at least. Even if I could repair it I probably won't, because it seems like maybe it wants to die. The same bike that random 6th street fratboy vigilantes accused me of stealing last week, and called the cops on me. This is the same bike that sat in a basement for twelve years before I started riding it, a month and a half ago. I don't need a house to fall on me -- no, having cars knock this bike out of my hand in less than twenty minutes and three meters is hint enough. So even if I could fix it, which would be quite a trick after everything that just happened, maybe I'll do something else with it. Make it into a trailer or something.

So anyway. So that's how my day has been. How are you?

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Cautious astronomers will have by now noted that I do not exactly play fair.
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This has been a very, very good Christmas. My parents came down and visited from Kentucky and it's been great. I think they're glad to have a short break from winter.

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